Summary

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Collectives

This issue examines how working collectively problematizes power relations within art institutions and groups and how this affects the implementation of less hierarchical structures. Given the urgent need to act, in a world where a state of emergency has become permanent, laboratories of social action, interdisciplinary research groups, and international discussion forums are forming on the margins of the art field. Seeking alternative forms of “being together,” these new collectives are reviving the concerns of several decades of shared creation.

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Family

As the basis for social organization and the primary site of socialization, the family has drawn particular attention in the visual arts since the inception of art history. As contemporary art seems well engaged in an examination of cultural practices, the family, in all its forms, is returning to the spotlight. Many artists today revisit family traditions, sites, and taboos, challenge what has been held as unspeakable by digging into archives, and invent new, intimate forms of sociability out of biographical experiences. This issue reflects on family histories as they are rewritten in contemporary art.

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