Summary

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Appropriation

Contemporary art practices are constantly going outside the field of art to appropriate the codes, gestures, and mechanisms of other social and cultural spheres. However, appropriation also involves the question of social responsibility with regards to artists and curators, particularly in recent debates around cultural appropriation. The aim of this issue is to take some distance from the polarization of the controversies so as to try to better understand what these various forms of appropriation show us about current artistic creation at the aesthetic, ethical, and political levels.

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Current Issue

Family

As the basis for social organization and the primary site of socialization, the family has drawn particular attention in the visual arts since the inception of art history. As contemporary art seems well engaged in an examination of cultural practices, the family, in all its forms, is returning to the spotlight. Many artists today revisit family traditions, sites, and taboos, challenge what has been held as unspeakable by digging into archives, and invent new, intimate forms of sociability out of biographical experiences. This issue reflects on family histories as they are rewritten in contemporary art.

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